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Book News
There is always so much book-related news out there, we decided to dedicate a page to attempting to organize some of it in one place. On this page you will find: Recent Releases; Upcoming Releases; Reviews; Movies, TV & Plays; Book Awards; and other Book-related news.


Recent & Upcoming Releases
Books that are being released soon, new hardcover titles that we are already excited about, or paperback releases that we've been waiting and waiting for.

 



Recent Releases

June 27, 2017:

Quiet Until the Thaw: A Novel by Alexandra Fuller. The debut novel from the bestselling author of the memoir Don't Let's Go to the Dogs Tonight.
Lakota Oglala Sioux Nation, South Dakota. Two Native American cousins, though bound by blood and by land, find themselves at odds as they grapple with the implications of their shared heritage.
A complex tale that spans generations and geography, this conjures the implications of an oppressed history, how we are bound not just to immediate family but to all who have come before and will come after us, and, most of all, to the notion that everything was always, and is always, connected.

The Child by Fiona Barton. The British author follows her bestselling debut, The Widow, with a psychological thriller that examines the impact of a secret on three women who have never met.

Seven Stones to Stand or Fall: A Collection of Outlander Fiction by Diana Gabaldon. A magnificent collection of Outlander short fiction—including two never-before-published novellas—featuring Jamie Fraser, Lord John Grey, Master Raymond, and many more.

The Windfall: A Novel by Diksha Basu. A heartfelt comedy of manners, this debut novel unfolds the story of a family discovering what it means to “make it” in modern India.

The Fate of the Tearling: Queen of the Tearling, Book 3 by Erika Johansen. The thrilling conclusion to the New York Times bestselling Tearling trilogy.

For teen readers  The Waking Land by Callie Bates. This is a riveting debut from a brilliant young writer whose boundless imagination places her among the finest authors of fantasy fiction, including Sarah J. Maas and Sabaa Tahir. Lady Elanna is fiercely devoted to the king who raised her like a daughter. But when he dies under mysterious circumstances, Elanna is accused of his murder—and must flee for her life.
Trapped between divided loyalties, she must summon the courage to confront a destiny that could tear her apart.

The Spy: A Novel of Mata Hari by Paulo Coelho. In his newest novel, the bestselling author of The Alchemist, brings to life one of history's most enigmatic women: Mata Hari. In paperback.

Heroes of the Frontier by Dave Eggers. A captivating, often hilarious novel of family, loss, wilderness, and the curse of a violent America, this is a powerful examination of our contemporary life and a rousing story of adventure. In paperback.

The Crow Girl by Erik Axl Sund. In a Stockholm city park, police find the tortured body of a youth. Then, they find two more, and it becomes clear that they are facing an extraordinary case—and an extraordinarily twisted killer. A tale of almost unfathomably heinous deeds and of the catastrophic damage, and the profound need for revenge, left in their wake. In paperback.

Smoke: A Novel by Dan Vyleta. This is a thrilling blend of historical fiction and fantasy, as three young friends scratch the surface of the grown-up world to discover startling wonders—and dangerous secrets. Staff recommended. In paperback.

June 20, 2017:

The Force by Don Winslow. “Ever since I started writing, I’ve wanted to write a big, New York City cop book,” says Edgar Award-finalist Winslow. This is it.

The Silent Corner: A Novel of Suspense by Dean Koontz. A dazzling new series, a pure adrenaline rush, debuts with Jane Hawk, a remarkable heroine certain to become an icon of suspense. Staff recommended.

Dangerous Minds: A Knight and Moon Novel by Janet Evanovich. The irrepressibly charming duo of Emerson Knight and Riley Moon returns in another gripping mystery, embarking on a worldwide investigation that exposes a conspiracy one hundred years in the making.

Kiss Carlo: A Novel by Adriana Trigiani. An exhilarating, epic novel of love, loyalty, and creativity—the story of an Italian-American family on the cusp of change.

Here and Gone: A Novel by Haylen Beck. A gripping, wonderfully tense suspense thriller about a mother's desperate fight to recover her stolen children from corrupt authorities.

Kangaroo Too : The Kangaroo Series Book #2 by Curtis C. Chen. This is bursting with adrenaline and intrigue in a unique outer space adventure.
On the way home from his latest mission, secret agent Kangaroo’s spacecraft is wrecked by a rogue mining robot. The agency tracks the bot back to the Moon, where a retired asteroid miner―code named “Clementine” ―might have information about who’s behind the sabotage.

The Underground River: A Novel by Martha Conway. Set aboard a nineteenth century riverboat theater, this is the moving, page-turning story of a charmingly frank and naive seamstress who is blackmailed into saving runaways on the Underground Railroad, jeopardizing her freedom, her livelihood, and a new love.

News of the World: A Novel by Paulette Jiles. In the aftermath of the Civil War, an aging itinerant news reader agrees to transport a young captive of the Kiowa back to her people in this exquisitely rendered, morally complex, multilayered novel of historical fiction. National Book Award Finalist. Now in paperback.

The Mandibles: A Family, 2029-2047 by Lionel Shriver. With dry wit and psychological acuity, this near-future novel explores the aftershocks of an economically devastating U.S. sovereign debt default on four generations of a once-prosperous American family. Down-to-earth and perfectly realistic in scale, this is not an over-the-top Blade Runner tale. It is not science fiction.
It is about money. Thus it is necessarily about bitterness, rivalry, and selfishness—but also about surreal generosity, sacrifice, and transformative adaptation to changing circumstances. Now in paperback.

Nicotine: A Novel by Nell Zink. A novel of obsession, idealism, and ownership, centered around a young woman who inherits her bohemian father's childhood home. In paperback.

Cooking for Picasso: A Novel by Camille Aubray. This captivating novel is inspired by a little-known interlude in the artist’s life. The French Riviera, spring 1936... now in paperback.

The Tea Planter's Wife: A Novel by Dinah Jefferies. The bestselling novel set in 1920s Ceylon, about a young Englishwoman who marries a charming tea plantation owner and widower, only to discover he's keeping terrible secrets about his past, including what happened to his first wife. In paperback.

The Fire This Time: A New Generation Speaks about Race by Jesmyn Ward. These groundbreaking essays and poems about race—collected by National Book Award-winner Jesmyn Ward and written by the most important voices of her generation—are “thoughtful, searing, and at times, hopeful. This is vivid proof that words are important, because of their power to both cleanse and to clarify." In paperback.

June 13, 2017:

The Rise and Fall of D.O.D.O.: A Novel by Neal Stephenson and Nicole Galland. From bestselling author Neal Stephenson and critically acclaimed historical and contemporary commercial novelist Nicole Galland comes a captivating and complex near-future thriller combining history, science, magic, mystery, intrigue, and adventure that questions the very foundations of the modern world. Staff recomended.

You Don't Have to Say You Love Me: A Memoir by Sherman Alexie. A searing, deeply moving memoir about family, love, loss, and forgiveness from the critically acclaimed, bestselling National Book Award-winning author. New [6/8/17] interview with Mary Ann Gwinn in The Seattle Times here.

A House Among the Trees: A Novel by Julia Glass. The story of an unusual bond between a world-famous writer and his assistant—a richly plotted novel of friendship and love, artistic ambition, the perils of celebrity, and the power of an unexpected legacy.

The Marsh King's Daughter by Karen Dionne. Mesmerizing psychological suspense, the story of a woman who must risk everything to hunt down the dangerous man who shaped her past and threatens to steal her future: her father.
She has a secret: she is the product of an abduction. Her mother was kidnapped as a teenager by her father and kept in a remote cabin. Born two years after the abduction, she loved her home in nature—fishing, tracking, hunting. And despite her father’s odd temperament and sometimes brutal behavior, she loved him, too . . . until she learned precisely how savage a person he could be.

The Chalk Artist: A Novel by Allegra Goodman. A tender affair and the redemptive power of art are at the core of this compelling novel from the National Book Award finalist.
Wise, warm, and enchanting, this is both a finely rendered portrait of modern love and a celebration of all the realms we inhabit: real and imagined, visual and virtual, seemingly independent yet hopelessly tangled.

Lockdown: A Novel of Suspense by Laurie R. King. A community comes together when threatened by someone with a thirst for revenge in this stunningly intricate, tautly plotted novel of rich psychological suspense from the bestselling author of the Mary Russell mysteries.
Tense, poignant, and brilliantly paced, this novel charts compelling characters on a collision course—a chain of interactions that locks together hidden lives, troubling secrets, and the bravest impulses of the human heart. 

The Templars' Last Secret: A Bruno, Chief of Police Novel by Martin Walker. This time a mysterious death brings ancient secrets to light, and it's up to our hero--and favorite gourmand--to connect the tangled threads of past and present.

The Space Between the Stars by Anne Corlett. In a breathtakingly vivid and emotionally gripping debut novel, one woman must confront the emptiness in the universe—and in her own heart—when a devastating virus reduces most of humanity to dust and memories.
Even though she wasn’t forced to emigrate from Earth, she willingly left the overpopulated, claustrophobic planet. And when a long relationship devolved into silence and suffocating sadness, she found work on a frontier world on the edges of civilization. Then the virus hit...

Hunger: A Memoir of (My) Body Roxane Gay. In her popular essays and Tumblr blog, Gay has written with intimacy and sensitivity about food and body. She takes readers along on her journey to understand herself in a searingly honest memoir of food, weight, self-image, and learning how to feed your hunger while taking care of yourself.

The Black Elfstone: The Fall of Shannara by Terry Brooks. The first book of the triumphant and epic four-part conclusion to the Shannara series, from one of the all-time masters of fantasy.
Across the Four Lands, peace has reigned for generations. But now, in the far north, an unknown enemy is massing. More troubling than the carnage is the strange and wondrous power wielded by the attackers—a breed of magic unfamiliar even to the Druid order.

Swimming in the Sink: A Memoir by Lynne Cox. In this stunning memoir of life after loss, open-water swimming legend and bestselling author, Lynne Cox tells of facing the one challenge that no amount of training could prepare her for. In paperback.

A Truck Full of Money by Tracy Kidder. With the power of a consummate storyteller, Tracy Kidder casts a fresh, critical, and often humorous eye on the way new ideas and new money are reshaping our culture and the world. A Truck Full of Money is a mesmerizing portrait of an irresistibly endearing man who is indefatigable, original, and as unpredictable as America itself. In paperback.

June 6, 2017:

The Ministry of Utmost Happiness: A Novel by Arundhati Roy. An intimate journey of many years across the Indian subcontinent, this ravishing, deeply humane novel reinvents what a novel can do and can be.

Do Not Become Alarmed: A Novel by Maile Meloy. The sun is shining, the sea is blue, the children have disappeared...

The Shark Club by Ann Kidd Taylor. In her first novel, Taylor (daughter of The Secret Life of Bees author Sue Monk Kidd) crafts an unexpected tale of romance and shark attacks set against the Gulf Coast's sparkling waters. A novel about love, loss, and sharks.

Magpie Murders: A Novel by Anthony Horowitz. This fiendishly brilliant, riveting thriller weaves a classic whodunit worthy of Agatha Christie into a chilling, ingeniously original modern-day mystery. Chosen for the lead review in June IndieNext.

Camino Island: A Novel by John Grisham. A daring heist from a secure vault deep below Princeton University’s Firestone Library; a prominent dealer in rare books, who occasionally dabbles in the black market of stolen books and manuscripts; a young novelist with a severe case of writer’s block. Inevitably there’s trouble in paradise as only John Grisham can deliver it.

Before We Were Yours: A Novel by Lisa Wingate. Two families, generations apart, are forever changed by a heartbreaking injustice in this poignant novel, inspired by a true story.

Defectors: A Novel by Joseph Kanon. The gripping story of one family torn apart by the divided loyalties of the Cold War, but it's also a revealing look at the wider community of defectors, American and British, living a twilit Moscow existence, granted privileges but never trusted, spies who have escaped one prison only to find themselves trapped in another that is even more sinister. Filled with authentic period detail and moral ambiguity, Defectors takes us to the heart of a world of secrets, where no one can be trusted and murder is just collateral damage.

The Essex Serpent: A Novel by Sarah Perry. An exquisitely talented young British author makes her American debut with this rapturously acclaimed historical novel, set in late nineteenth-century England, about an intellectually minded young widow, a pious vicar, and a rumored mythical serpent that explores questions about science and religion, skepticism, and faith, independence and love.

She Rides Shotgun: A Novel by Jordan Harper. A propulsive, gritty novel about a girl marked for death who must fight and steal to stay alive, learning from the most frightening man she knows—her father. A gripping and emotionally wrenching novel that upends even our most long-held expectations about heroes, villains, and victims. Nate takes Polly to save her life, but in the end it may very well be Polly who saves him.

Hue 1968: A Turning Point of the American War in Vietnam by Mark Bowden. From the author of Black Hawk Down comes his most ambitious work yet, the story of the centerpiece of the Tet Offensive and a turning point in the American War in Vietnam.

For ages 8 - 12  Bravelands #1: Broken Pride by Erin Hunter.  Heed the call of the wild with this brand-new, action-packed animal fantasy series from the  bestselling author of Warriors.
A lion cast out from his pride.
An elephant who can read the bones of the dead.
A baboon rebelling against his destiny.
For generations, the animals of the African plains have followed a single rule: only kill to survive. But when an unthinkable act of betrayal shatters the peace, the fragile balance between predators and prey will rest in the paws of three unlikely heroes.
Set in an epic new world and told from three different animals’ points of view, Bravelands will thrill readers who’ve made Erin Hunter a bestselling phenomenon.

For teen readers  Once and for All by Sarah Dessen. In this latest teen romance, cynical Louna finds an unexpected match while pitching in with her family’s wedding business over the summer.

Before the Fall by Noah Hawley. On a foggy summer night, eleven people--ten privileged, one down-on-his-luck painter--depart Martha's Vineyard on a private jet headed for New York. Sixteen minutes later, the unthinkable happens: the plane plunges into the ocean.  Winner of the 2017 Edgar Award for Best Novel. Staff recommended. In paperback.

Marrow Island by Alexis M. Smith. Captivates in the first few pages. PNBA award winner. Staff recommended. In paperback.

Dear Mr. M: A Novel by Herman Koch. In the tour-de-force, hair-raising new novel told from alternating points of view, where no one is to be trusted, Herman Koch weaves together an intricate tale of a writer in decline, a teenage couple in love, a missing teacher, and a single book that entwines all of their fates. In paperback.

As Good as Gone: A Novel by Larry Watson. He captures our longing for the Old West and its heroes, and he challenges our understanding of loyalty and justice. Both tough and tender, it is a stunning achievement. Staff recommended. In paperback.

The Wangs vs. the World by Jade Chang. A Chinese-American family tumbles from riches to rags in this jam-packed, high-energy debut. Switching among the points of view of all the Wangs and several supporting players, racing back and forth in time and across the country and the world, dropping into Chinese, stuffing in stand-up routines and savvy details on finance, journalism, the beauty industry, and the art world, this debut novelist holds nothing back. Head-spinning fun. In paperback.

Miller's Valley: A Novel by Anna Quindlen. In a small town on the verge of big change, a young woman unearths deep secrets about her family and unexpected truths about herself. In paperback.

Mercury: A Novel by Margot Livesey. At once a tense psychological drama and a taut emotional thriller exploring love, obsession, and the deceits that pull a family apart, this is a riveting tour de force. A Seattle Times Best Book of the Year. In paperback.

American Ulysses: A Life of Ulysses S. Grant by Ronald C. White. A major new biography of one of America’s greatest generals—and most misunderstood presidents. In paperback.

Seinfeldia: How a Show About Nothing Changed Everything by Jennifer Keishin Armstrong. This intimate history is full of gossipy details, show trivia, and insights into how famous episodes came to be. In paperback.

Grunt: The Curious Science of Humans at War by Mary Roach. A finalist for the Los Angeles Times Science & Technology Book Prize. The inimitable author explores the science of keeping human beings intact, awake, sane, uninfected and uninfested in the bizarre and extreme circumstances of war. In paperback.

Discovering Seattle Parks: A Local's Guide by Linnea Westerlind. A new guide from writer who visited all of the city’s 400+ parks and wrote about her favorites. In paperback. New [7/7/17] review in The Seattle Times.

 



Upcoming Releases.

Mrs. Fletcher: A Novel by Tom Perrotta. From one of the most popular and bestselling authors of our time, a penetrating and hilarious new novel about sex, love, and identity on the frontlines of America’s culture wars. August 1, 2017.

Y is for Yesterday : A Kinsey Millhone Novel by Sue Grafton. The darkest and most disturbing case report from the files of Kinsey Millhone, Y begins in 1979, when four teenage boys from an elite private school sexually assault a fourteen-year-old classmate—and film the attack.  Not long after, the tape goes missing and the suspected thief, a fellow classmate, is murdered. In the investigation that follows, one boy turns state’s evidence and two of his peers are convicted. But the ringleader escapes without a trace.
                Now, it’s 1989 and one of the perpetrators, Fritz McCabe, has been released from prison. Moody, unrepentant, and angry, he is a virtual prisoner of his ever-watchful parents—until a copy of the missing tape arrives with a ransom demand. That’s when the McCabes call Kinsey Millhone for help. As she is drawn into their family drama, she keeps a watchful eye on Fritz. But he’s not the only one being haunted by the past. A vicious sociopath with a grudge against Millhone may be leaving traces of himself for her to find…August 22, 2017.

Glass Houses: A Chief Inspector Gamache Novel by Louise Penny. When a mysterious figure appears in Three Pines one cold November day, Armand Gamache and the rest of the villagers are at first curious. Then wary. Through rain and sleet, the figure stands unmoving, staring ahead.
In her latest utterly gripping book, the bestselling author shatters the conventions of the crime novel to explore what Gandhi called the court of conscience. A court that supersedes all others. August 29, 2017.

The Book of Dust : Volume 1 by Philip Pullman. The much-anticipated new work from the author of The Golden Compass is coming at last! He returns to the parallel world of Lyra Belacqua and His Dark Materials for a thrilling and epic adventure in which daemons, alethiometers, and the Magisterium all play a part. October 19, 2017.

In the Midst of Winter by Isabel Allende. A love story set in Brooklyn and South America about a human rights scholar and an immigrant from Guatemala. November 7, 2017.

Artemis: A Novel by Andy Weir. The bestselling author of The Martian returns with an irresistible new near-future thriller--a heist story set on the moon. November 14, 2017.

 



 

Reviews and Columns
Recent reviews of new and/or notable titles, books that have a specific interest to the northwest -- author and/or setting -- and one more place for us to share our latest favorites! Lots of links to articles about books.

 

June 25, 2017. A fateful literary meeting: Raymond Carver and Haruki Murakami. The two writers met in person only once, but it provided a lifetime of inspiration; most recently shown in Murakami’s new collection Men Without Women: Stories, published May 9, 2017. An interesting article all about it, here.

 


 

June 22, 2017. The Seattle Public Library and Seattle Arts & Lectures’ Summer Reading Bingo program is going on now; arts critic Moira Macdonald shares how she’s tackling some of those tough categories. Her column with suggestions here.

 


 

June 20, 2017. Theft by Finding: Diaries (1977-2002). David Sedaris’ diaries paint a life spent in observation. New interview on The PBS NewsHour Bookshelf, here.

 



cover image: Images of the West

June 15, 2017. Images of the West, a lovely coffee table book by local author and gallery owner, Randall J. Hodges.
We are thrilled to be one of the very few places to carry Mr. Hodges' beautiful new book.

Randall J Hodges Fine Art Photography Gallery is located at 317 Main Street, Edmonds.

Visit his web site here.

And there is a fantastic article/interview in the Edmonds Beacon that tells all: how he started taking photos; how he ended up in Edmonds; the tripod rule... here.

 

 


 

 

June 9, 2017. Author Fredrik Backman writes about Beartown, a frozen little community in the north of Sweden where events lead to a gun pointed at someone’s forehead.  A winning tale of hockey and small-town scandal. New review in The Seattle Times.

 


 

June 3, 2017. 3 new thrillers for summer reading, including a previously unpublished Michael Crichton novel. The column here.

 


 

June 2, 2017. Review: Since We Fell: Woman’s breakdown, search for father don’t end well. Dennis Lehane has written a series of books about private detectives, but his latest goes in a different direction. It’s essentially a nuanced and insightful character study, combining the best of literary fiction with elements of psychological suspense and the thriller genre. The full review here.

May 25, 2017. Dennis Lehane talks about his latest book, which like many of his other books is set to be a movie. Since We Fell: A Novel by Dennis Lehane. The review/interview here.


 

June 1, 2017. Adaptation of Maria Semple’s set-in-Seattle novel, starring Julia Roberts, lands at HBO. The article here.

 


 

 

May 31, 2017. Found: A Life in Mountain Rescue, published in paperback, May 1, 2017. Local author/climber Bree Loewen writes about a life in mountain rescue. Loewen, who lives in Carnation, writes a page-turner of a memoir about her volunteer work with Seattle Mountain Rescue. The review here.

 

 


 

May 26, 2017. From the PBS NewsHour: 19 summer books that will keep you up all night reading.
For the best summer reads, we turned to two authors who own independent bookstores and their book-loving staff. Louise Erdrich, is the author of 15 novels, and owns Birchbark Books in Minneapolis, while Emma Straub, whose novels include “Modern Lovers” and the “Vacationers,” recently opened Books are Magic with her husband in Brooklyn.
Here are Erdrich and Straub’s essential summer books, along with more recommendations from their staff.

 


 

May 26th, 2017. A poignant look at the realities and dreams of an immigrant family: The Leavers: A Novel by Lisa Ko. New review in the Seattle Times.

 


 

May 16, 2017. 15 books recommended for your summer reading pleasure — plus a dozen paperbacks. The column in The Seattle Times here.

 


 

May 16, 2017. Mary Ann Gwinn / Lit Life Columnist. 9 local literary celebs tell us what they’re reading this summer. The column here.

 


 

May 15, 2017. 10 of the summer’s hottest crime-fiction titles. The column here.

 



 

 

 




Movies, TV, Plays
We can't figure out if Hollywood is just completely out of new ideas, or if they finally figured out what all of us already know -- you will never run out of great books! Here are just some of the latest titles to make it to the stage or screen, current and upcoming...

 

 


Current...

American Gods by Neil Gaiman. 10 episodes coming to Starz network. Beginning April 30, 2017.

The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot. TV movie on HBO starring Oprah Winfrey premieres April 22, 2017.

Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood. Coming as a Hulu original series. Adapted from the classic novel this is the story of life in the dystopia of Gilead, a totalitarian society in what was formerly the United States. Facing environmental disasters and a plunging birthrate, Gilead is ruled by a twisted fundamentalism in its militarized ‘return to traditional values'. As one of the few remaining fertile women, Offred (Elisabeth Moss) is a Handmaid in the Commander’s household, one of the caste of women forced into sexual servitude as a last desperate attempt to repopulate the world. Also starring Alexis Bledel [Gilmore Girls] and Samira Wiley [Orange is the New Black]. The 10-episode first season premieres on April 26, 2017.

New [4/26/17] review here. "... a terrifying story of a future that looks like the past. The Hulu series, based on the 1985 Margaret Atwood novel, is a cautionary tale, a story of resistance and a work of impeccable world-building. It is unflinching, vital and scary as hell."

Future release dates ...

The Dark Tower by Stephen King. This adaptation has been in development limbo forever. Combining sci-fi, western, and horror elements, the film is about Roland Deschain (Idris Elba) traversing an Old West-style world in search of the Man in Black (Matthew McConaughey), as well as the Dark Tower, which might save the world. Nikolaj Arcel is directing and King, Ron Howard, and Brian Grazer are producing. A TV series is expected to follow in 2018, showing Sony's commitment to the project. Possible release date July 28, 2017.

The Glass Castle by Jeannette Walls. A young girl comes of age in a dysfunctional family of nonconformist nomads with a mother who's an eccentric artist and an alcoholic father who would stir the children's imagination with hope as a distraction to their poverty. Based on the 2005 memoir. Walls herself (the adult version is played by Brie Larson, the 10-year-old version by Ella Anderson), her artist mother (Naomi Watts), alcoholic father (Woody Harrelson), and Walls's three siblings. Scheduled release date: August 11, 2017.

It by Stephen King. In the small town of Derry, Maine, seven children come face-to-face with life problems, bullies and a monster that takes the shape of a clown called Pennywise. This time around Bill Skarsgård is playing Pennywise. The first trailer has been released. Scheduled for release September 8, 2017.

The Snowman by Jo Nesbo. Detective Harry Hole, the hard-boiled detective created by the Norwegian crime novelist, investigates the disappearance of a woman whose pink scarf is found wrapped around an ominous-looking snowman. Starring Michael Fassbender, Val Kilmer, Chloë Sevigny, J.K. Simmons. Scheduled for release October 13, 2017.

Murder on the Orient Express by Agatha Christie. The classic mystery tells the tale of a murder on a train under investigation by detective Hercule Poirot. This new adaptation will star Johnny Depp, Michelle Pfeiffer, Star Wars: The Force Awaken breakout actress Daisy Ridley, Hamilton star Leslie Odom Jr. and Penelope Cruz as Ohlsson. Scheduled for release November 22, 2017.

Alias Grace by Margaret Atwood. A novel based on the true story of Grace Marks, a housemaid and immigrant from Ireland who was imprisoned in 1843, perhaps wrongly, for the murder of her employer Thomas Kinnear. Grace claims to have no memory of the murder yet the facts are irrefutable. A decade after, Dr. Simon Jordan tries to help Grace recall her past.
Margaret Atwood will be stepping back in time and in front of the cameras for the TV adaptation of her novel in a cameo as "the disapproving woman." [which she gleefully tweeted to all of her followers!]
Special 6-episode mini-series co-production [CBS/Netflix] coming in 2017.

On Chesil Beach by Ian McEwan. The author adapted his delicate novella, about a young couple on their wedding night in 1962, for the screen; Saorise Ronan, who starred in the excellent movie version of Atonement, plays the new bride. No date set, but this sounds like the sort of movie that gets held for end-of-year release. TBA 2017.

Annihilation by Jeff VanderMeer. This sci-fi film, based on  2014 novel (the first of his Southern Reach trilogy), is about an expedition to find a missing man in an environmental disaster zone (the less you know, the better). The cast includes Natalie Portman, Jennifer Jason Leigh, Gina Rodriguez, Tessa Thompson, Oscar Isaac, and David Gyasi. Alex Garland (Ex Machina) is directing. TBA 2017.

It's What I Do: A Photographer's Life of Love and War by Lynsey Addario. [published February 5, 2015] A Pacific Northwest bestseller spring of 2015. A memoir by the award-winning international photojournalist. Director: Steven Spielberg. Starring: Jennifer Lawrence. TBA 2017.

Looking for Alaska by John Green. Green's first young adult novel. TBA 2017.

Brain on Fire: My Month of Madness by Susannah Cahalan. A 2012 bestselling autobiography by the New York Post writer. It details her struggle with a rare autoimmune disease and her recovery. TBA 2017.

The November Criminals by Sam Munson. The author's first novel for young adults is a thoughtful coming-of-age story and an engaging teenage noir. TBA 2017.

Fifty Shades Freed by E. L. James. The final book in the Fifty Shades saga, Christian and Ana navigate their most dangerous, treacherous relationship yet: marriage.
Who's starring: Jamie Dornan and Dakota Johnson fill the shoes of Christian and Ana again, while newcomers like Arielle Kebbel will join the franchise. Scheduled release date February 9, 2018.

Ready Player One by Ernest Cline. When the creator of a popular video game system dies, a virtual contest is created to compete for his billions. A contest users are willing to kill to win. Director: Steven Spielberg. Writer: Ernest Cline (screenplay). Scheduled release date March 30, 2018.

Where'd You Go, Bernadette by Maria Semple. After her anxiety-ridden mother disappears, 15-year-old Bee does everything she can to track her down, discovering her troubled past in the process.
Director: Richard Linklater; Stars: Cate Blanchett, Kristen Wiig, Billy Crudup. TBA.

The Good Lord Bird by James McBride. Liev Schreiber and Jaden Smith will star. Smith will play a young slave who hooks up with radical abolitionist John Brown (Schreiber) in 1856 Kansas. The Good Lord Bird won the 2013 National Book Award. Listed as "in development" so, possibly a movie in theaters sometime in 2017, or...

The Passage by Justin Cronin. No date announced yet. Book #2 in the series, The Twelve, was finally published October 16, 2012. And is now available in paperback [7/30/13]. Book three: The City of Mirrors: A Novel was finally published May 24, 2016! The first movie is still listed as "in development..."

Moviemaker Todd Field has arranged to produce, co-write and direct Beautiful Ruins, the newest [2012] Jess Walter novel. Field previously directed Little Children, based on the Tom Perrotta novel. More info as it becomes available...

 



Book Awards
There are an amazing number of awards given to books and authors throughout the year. We will attempt to keep you updated on the big ones, and on the ones we particularly agree with.

 


 

June 15, 2017. Author Naomi Alderman wins the 2017 Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction for The Power.

What would happen if women suddenly possessed a fierce new power?
The world is a recognizable place: there's a rich Nigerian boy who lounges around the family pool; a foster kid whose religious parents hide their true nature; an ambitious American politician; a tough London girl from a tricky family. But then a vital new force takes root and flourishes, causing their lives to converge with devastating effect. Teenage girls now have immense physical power--they can cause agonizing pain and even death. And, with this small twist of nature, the world drastically resets.

From award-winning author Naomi Alderman, this is speculative fiction at its most ambitious and provocative, at once taking us on a thrilling journey to an alternate reality, and exposing our own world in bold and surprising ways.

 To be published in the United States October 10, 2017.

Tessa Ross, 2017 Chair of Judges, said: “The judges and I were thrilled to make this decision. We debated this wonderful shortlist for many hours but kept returning to Naomi Alderman’s brilliantly imagined dystopia – her big ideas and her fantastic imagination.”

The other short-listed finalists were:

  • Stay With Me by Ayọ̀bámi Adébáyọ̀̀
  • The Dark Circle by Linda Grant
  • The Sport of Kings by C.E. Morgan
  • First Love by Gwendoline Riley
  • Do Not Say We Have Nothing by Madeleine Thien

The Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction is the UK’s most prestigious annual book award for fiction written by a woman.

See all kinds of information about the prize, and winners, current and former, here.

 


 

April 27, 2017. Mystery Writers of America is proud to announce the winners of the
2017 Edgar Allan Poe Awards
, honoring the best in mystery fiction, non-fiction and television published or produced in 2016.
A few highlights:

  • Best Novel: Before the Fall by Noah Hawley. [also staff recommended]
  • Best First Novel by an American Author: Under the Harrow by Flynn Berry.
  • Best Paperback Original: Rain Dogs by Adrian McKinty.
  • Best Fact Crime:  The Wicked Boy: The Mystery of a Victorian Child Murderer by Kate Summerscale
  • Best Critical/Biography: Shirley Jackson: A Rather Haunted Life by Ruth Franklin

For the complete list of the winners and all of the nominees visit The Edgars web site.

 


 

April 10, 2017. 2017 Pulitzer winners have been announced!

Fiction: The Underground Railroad, by Colson Whitehead.

Fiction finalists:

  • Imagine Me Gone by Adam Haslett.

  • The Sport of Kings by C. E. Morgan

History:  Blood in the Water: The Attica Prison Uprising of 1971 and Its Legacy, by Heather Ann Thompson.

Biography or Autobiography: The Return: Fathers, Sons and the Land in Between, by Hisham Matar.

Biography finalists:

  • In the Darkroom, by Susan Faludi
  • When Breath Becomes Air, by the late Paul Kalanithi

General Nonfiction: Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City, by Matthew Desmond.

The complete list of winners and finalists in all categories are available at the official Pulitzer web site.

 

 

 


 

March 27, 2017. PEN America is thrilled to announce the winners for its 2017 PEN America Literary Awards. 

  • PEN/John Kenneth Galbraith Award for Nonfiction: To an author of a distinguished book of general nonfiction published in 2015 or 2016 possessing notable literary merit and critical perspective and illuminating important contemporary issues:
    Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City by Matthew Desmond.
  • PEN/E.O. Wilson Literary Science Writing Award: For a book of literary nonfiction on the subject of the physical or biological sciences published in 2016:
    Patient H.M.: A Story of Memory, Madness, and Family Secrets by Luke Dittrich.
  • PEN Open Book Award: For an exceptional book-length work of literature by an author of color published in 2016:
    What Is Not Yours Is Not Yours by Helen Oyeyemi.

For all of the information visit the PEN web site.

 

 


 

March 16, 2017. Recipients of the National Book Critic Circle Awards for publishing year 2016:

  • Poetry. Ishion Hutchinson. House of Lords and Commons.
  • Criticism. Carol Anderson. White Rage: The Unspoken Truth of Our Racial Divide
  • Autobiography. Hope Jahren. Lab Girl.
  • Biography. Ruth Franklin. Shirley Jackson: A Rather Haunted Life
  • Nonfiction. Matthew Desmond. Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City
  • Fiction. Louise Erdrich. LaRose.
  • The winner of the 2016 John Leonard Prize which honors an author's first book in any genre:
    Yaa Gyasi for Homegoing.
  • The Ivan Sandrof Lifetime Achievement Award: Margaret Atwood.

More information and all of the details available at the web site: bookcritics.org

 


 

January 23, 2017. American Library Association announces 2017 youth media award winners:

  • John Newbery Medal for most outstanding contribution to children's literature: The Girl Who Drank the Moon, written by Kelly Barnhill. The story is pure magic, distinguished by careful development of a complex plot and indelible evocation of unique characters. Love, heartbreak, hope, sorrow, and wonder all shine in exquisite, lyrical prose.
  • Randolph Caldecott Medal for the most distinguished American picture book for children: Radiant Child: The Story of Young Artist Jean-Michel Basquiat by Javaka Steptoe. Steptoe, an author and artist who has illustrated a dozen books, is the son of illustrator John Steptoe. Radiant Child also earned the Coretta Scott King (Illustrator) Book Award.
    Like Jean-Michel Basquiat’s work, Steptoe’s illustrations radiate energy and immediacy. A patch-worked canvas of scavenged wood, painted and collaged with photos, and images of human anatomy, evokes the improvisatory nature of Basquiat’s art. “Radiant Child” resonates with emotion that connects Steptoe with Basquiat and Basquiat with young readers.
  • Printz and YALSA awards for excellence in literature and nonfiction for young adults, respectively: March: Book Three, created by Rep. John Lewis (D-Ga.), Andrew Aydin and Nate Powell, took home both the Printz and the YALSA, as well as the Robert F. Sibert award for most distinguished informational book for children. Lewis and co-writer Aydin were also awarded the Coretta Scott King (Author) Book Award, recognizing an African American author of outstanding books for children and young adults.

For more information about the winners, the 2017 Honor Books, and all of the awards the ALA bestowed this year: ala.org web site

 






2017 PNBA book awards


 

January 10, 2017.  2017 Pacific Northwest Book Awards announced:

  • Thunder Boy Jr. by Sherman Alexie. Alexie's first book for children is a picture book to cherish, starring a strong-willed little boy who just wants to make his mark on the world with a name all his own.
  • Bitch Planet Book One: Extraordinary Machine by Kelly Sue DeConnick. A smart, profane, and thoroughly terrifying examination of widespread intersectional oppression that feels all too familiar. Pick up this book and join the ranks of the Non-Compliant.
  • To The Bright Edge Of The World by Eowyn Ivey. Returning to the same lush Alaskan landscape as The Snow Child, Ivey's second novel is as stunning and enchanting as her first. An absorbing and beautiful epistolary novel of adventure, danger and discovery and a love story fraught with an equal fear of the unknown.
  • On Trails: An Exploration by Robert Moor. In this excellent debut, Moor guides the reader with evolution, anthropology, adventure and reflection through the literal and metaphorical trails that lead our lives.
  • Barkskins by Annie Proulx. A sweeping saga spanning more than 700 pages and nearly 300 years, Proulx's magnum opus follows two families for generations as they attempt to tame their world and conquer the physical and metaphorical forests that surround them. A lush and ambitious piece of literature that may be her best work yet.
  • Marrow Island by Alexis M. Smith. Marrow Island was once another jewel of the beautiful San Juans but has become the jagged memory of disaster—one that took the life of Lucie’s father. Addressing environmental issues, cult behavior, family loss and broken friendships, Marrow Island is an original and riveting read.
  • Shrill: Notes from a Loud Woman by Lindy West. This brilliant book will make your sides hurt with laughter while inspiring empathy to the difficulties of living as a large, feminist woman in today's world. West uses humor as a gateway to grab the attention of those who may not normally want to read a "feminist book." A conversation starting read.

 

 


 

 

November 16, 2016. The National Book Award winners have been announced.

  • Fiction: Colson Whitehead, The Underground Railroad
  • Nonfiction: Ibram X. Kendi, Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America
  • Poetry: Daniel Borzutzky, The Performance of Becoming Human
  • Young People's Literature: John Lewis, Andrew Aydin & Nate Powell (Artist), March: Book Three

For all of the long lists and the finalists visit the National Book Foundation web site.

Great article in The Seattle Times.

 


 

October 26, 2016. Paul Beatty Becomes First American To Win Man Booker Prize For Fiction. The chair of the judging panel said his novel The Sellout was a unanimous choice.
Three years after the Man Booker Prize was opened up to all novels written in English and published in the UK – regardless of whether they were British, Irish, Commonwealth or from, say, Micronesia – the Americans finally have a winner: Paul Beatty with The Sellout. All the information and details on the Man Booker web site.

 


 

October 13, 2016. The Nobel Prize in Literature for 2016. Something is happening: Bob Dylan wins the Nobel in literature. The singer-songwriter was recognized for "having created new poetic expressions within the great American song tradition." Article in The Seattle Times.

And for all kinds of "interesting" reactions, [pro and con!] just Google it... fascinating!

 


 

October 8, 2016. The Washington State Book Awards.
A book award is given based on the strength of the publication's literary merit, lasting importance and overall quality. The awards and celebration are sponsored by The Seattle Public Library Foundation.

2016 Book Award Winners (for books published in 2015):

  • Fiction: The Sasquatch Hunter's Almanac by Sharma Shields
  • Poetry: Reconnaissance by Carl Phillips
  • Biography/Memoir: Road Trip by Mark Rozema
  • History/General Nonfiction: Dead Wake: The Last Crossing of the Lusitania by Erik Larson

Scandiuzzi Children's Book Award Finalists:

  • Picture Book: Boats for Papa written and illustrated by Jessixa Bagley
  • Books for Early Readers (ages 6 to 8) Here Comes the Tooth Fairy Cat by Deborah Underwood
  • Books for Middle Readers (ages 9 to 12) Red Butterfly by A.L. Sonnichsen
  • Books for Young Adults (ages 13 to 18): The Game of Love and Death by Martha Brockenbrough

 

 


 

 



 



Other Book-Related News
There is always something going on in the Seattle book world! Author appearances in and around the Northwest, interesting book-related news, anything that doesn't fit in the above categories we'll mention here.

 

Seattle Arts & Lectures 2017-18 season announced:

The Literary Arts Series presents original talks by six outstanding authors whose works range from multi-award-winning novels and short stories to social commentaries and biographies. 

  • Wednesday, October 18, 2017. Ron Chernow.  A new biography of Ulysses S. Grant.
  • Tuesday, November 28, 2017. Isabel Allende. With her new novel In the Midst of Winter.
  • Wednesday, January 17, 2018. Jesmyn Ward.
  • Thursday, February 15, 2018. Colson Whitehead.
  • Friday, March 30, 2018. Laura Lippman and David Simon.
  • Monday, May 7, 2018. Viet Thanh Nguyen.

For the complete schedule, more information about the series, and to buy tickets, visit the Seattle Arts & Lecture web site.

 

 


Town Hall is Seattle’s community cultural center, offering a broad program of music, humanities, civic discourse, and world culture events.
A sample of the upcoming events:

  •  June 20, 2017. 7:30pm. Tuesday. Brian Merchant with Alex Pasternack. The Secret History of the iPhone.
    Before Steve Jobs introduced “the one device,” as he called it, a cell phone was merely what you used to make calls on the go. How did the iPhone transform our world and turn Apple into the most valuable company ever? In The One Device: The Secret History of the iPhone, veteran technology journalist Brian Merchant reveals the international inside story you won’t hear from Cupertino. Reporting on interviews with the engineers, inventors, and developers involved in the iPhone’s creation, Merchant, in conversation with journalist and producer Alex Pasternack, explains how the cutting-edge tech that makes the world work—touch screens, motion trackers, and even artificial intelligence—made their way into our pockets.

 

  • June 21, 2017. 5:30pm. Wednesday. Michael Medved and Dr. Diane Medved.
    The husband and wife duo, radio show host and political commentator Michael Medved and psychologist Dr. Diane Medved, share the stage to talk about their recently published books in this event sponsored by Discovery Institute’s Chapman Center for Citizen Leadership.

    Hear from Michael as he discusses his latest book, The American Miracle: Divine Providence in the Rise of the Republic. He recounts significant events in America’s rise to prosperity and power and discusses the many improbabilities that played out in our nation’s rise to greatness. Medved argues that these events unfolded according to a master plan.

    Then Diane discusses insights from her book Don’t Divorce: Powerful Arguments for Saving and Revitalizing Your Marriage. She examines the normalization of divorce and the influence of the “divorce industry,” and offers ways to revive and recover a dying marriage.

 

  • June 27, 2017. 7:30pm. Tuesday. Elliott Bay Book Company presents: Arundhati Roy.
    Nearly 20 years after her first appearance in Seattle for The God of Small Things, Arundhati Roy returns with her much-anticipated second novel, The Ministry of Utmost Happiness. Her writing in the intervening time has included thought-provoking nonfiction in subjects such as politics, activism, and investigation. Roy’s new novel shifts between moods and time frames, first-person and omniscient narration. Publisher’s Weekly says: “Sweeping, intricate, and sometimes topical, the novel’s complexity feels essential to Roy’s vision of a bewilderingly beautiful, contradictory, and broken world.”

Visit the web site for more information, and more scheduled events.

 


 

The Seattle Public Library always has lots of visiting authors and book-related events.

  •  July 11, 2017. Tuesday. 7pm. Clarion West presents science fiction author Connie Willis at the Central Library.

Visit the Seattle Public Library web site for the details, and the complete schedule of events.

 


 

Seattle Children's Theatre has great family-friendly fare on offer! And quite often there is a book involved.

The 2017 - 2018 season has been announced:

  • September 28–November 26, 2017 Go, Dog. Go!
    The madcap party never stops with these zany canines. High-spirited singing, zooming cars, construction zone chaos, and up-all-night antics will have the whole family in stitches.
  • November 9–December 31, 2017 Mr. Popper's Penguins
    Mr. and Mrs. Popper are an ordinary couple in an ordinary English town…until some extraordinary Antarctic penguins come to stay!
  • January 18–March 4, 2018 The Little Prince
    In the middle of the Sahara Desert, a stranded aviator meets the Little Prince, a young boy from a small, faraway asteroid, and a dreamlike journey unfolds across a universe.

Visit the web site for the details and the complete schedule!

 


 

Book-It Repertory Theater.

Visit the Book-It web site for the complete schedule and more details.

The 2016-17 slate of Book-It mainstage productions:

June 6 – July 2, 2017. Welcome To Braggsville, by T. Geronimo Johnson. This is a literary coming-of-age story for a new generation that skewers issues of race, class, social media, and more. The artistic team is led by the adapter/director of last season’s Slaughterhouse-Five.
Great new [6/16/17] review in The Seattle Times. And listed in "Performances Picks" in the Seattle Times.

 

Announcing the 2017-2018 Mainstage Season:

  • September 13–October 15, 2017. I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, by Maya Angelou.

  • February 7–April 2, 2018. The Maltese Falcon, by Dashiell Hammett.
    A theatrical culinary collaboration with Café Nordo in Pioneer Square.

  • April 19–May 6, 2018. The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, by Junot Díaz.




The 5th Avenue Theatre 2016-17 season schedule has been announced. As usual, it includes a couple of performances based on books!

  • July 11 - 30, 2017. Fun Home. Alison Bechdel’s autobiographic graphic novel about coming of age as a lesbian in a family full of secrets thrives in this moving and much-lauded Broadway hit. The five-time Tony winner comes to Seattle on national tour.

Visit the web site for the entire season schedule and all of the other details. 5thAvenue.org



The Village Theatre. Locations in Everett and Issaquah.

For all kinds of information visit the web site: VillageTheatre.org


 

 
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