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Book News
There is always so much book-related news out there, we decided to dedicate a page to attempting to organize some of it in one place. On this page you will find: Recent Releases; Upcoming Releases; Reviews; Movies, TV & Plays; Book Awards; and other Book-related news.


Recent & Upcoming Releases
Books that are being released soon, new hardcover titles that we are already excited about, or paperback releases that we've been waiting and waiting for.

 



Recent Releases

August 22, 2017:

Y is for Yesterday : A Kinsey Millhone Novel by Sue Grafton. The darkest and most disturbing case report from the files of Kinsey Millhone, Y begins in 1979, when four teenage boys from an elite private school sexually assault a fourteen-year-old classmate—and film the attack.  Not long after, the tape goes missing and the suspected thief, a fellow classmate, is murdered. In the investigation that follows, one boy turns state’s evidence and two of his peers are convicted. But the ringleader escapes without a trace.
                Now, it’s 1989 and one of the perpetrators, Fritz McCabe, has been released from prison. Moody, unrepentant, and angry, he is a virtual prisoner of his ever-watchful parents—until a copy of the missing tape arrives with a ransom demand. That’s when the McCabes call Kinsey Millhone for help. As she is drawn into their family drama, she keeps a watchful eye on Fritz. But he’s not the only one being haunted by the past. A vicious sociopath with a grudge against Millhone may be leaving traces of himself for her to find…

The Heart's Invisible Furies: A Novel by John Boyne. A sweeping, heartfelt saga about the course of one man's life, beginning and ending in post-war Ireland.

The Red-Haired Woman: A Novel by Orhan Pamuk. From the Nobel Prize winner comes a fable of fathers and sons and the desires that come between them.

Young Jane Young: A Novel by Gabrielle Zevin. From the author of the bestseller The Storied Life of A. J. Fikry comes another novel that will have everyone talking.
A smart, funny, and moving novel about what it means to be a woman of any age, and captures not just the mood of our recent highly charged political season, but also the double standards alive and well in every aspect of life for women.

Sulfur Springs: A Cork O'Connor Mystery Novel by William Kent Krueger. In this latest pulse-pounding thriller, Cork O’Connor’s search for a missing man in the Arizona desert puts him at the center of a violent power struggle along the Mexican border, a struggle that might cost Cork everything and everyone he holds most dear.

For little kids and all Jan Brett fans!  The Mermaid by Jan Brett. A striking under-the-sea version of Goldilocks as only Jan Brett could create. Vibrant, intricate scenes of an underwater paradise transport this classic fairy tale to a magical setting inspired by the seas off the coast of Okinawa, Japan. Chock full of fish and fauna and adventure, this story will enchant readers of all ages.

The Sorbonne Affair: A Hugo Marston Novel by Mark Pryor. Someone is spying on American author Helen Hancock. everyone at the Sorbonne Hotel has something to hide, and no one is being fully honest with Hugo. He teams up with Lieutenant Camille Lerens to solve the case, but a close call on the streets of Paris proves that he could be the killer’s next target. In paperback.

Telling Tales: A Vera Stanhope Mystery by Ann Cleeves. From the winner of the CWA Diamond Dagger Award, comes an early book in the Vera Stanhope series, which has been brought to life by Brenda Blethyn in the hit TV series Vera. In paperback.

Blood in the Water: The Attica Prison Uprising of 1971 and Its Legacy by Heather Ann Thompson.
Winner of the 2017 Pulitzer Prize in History.
The first definitive history of the infamous 1971 Attica Prison uprising, the state's violent response, and the victims' decades-long quest for justive. In paperback.

Code Warriors: NSA's Codebreakers and the Secret Intelligence War Against the Soviet Union by Stephen Budiansky. A sweeping, in-depth history of NSA, featuring a series of appendixes that explain the technical details of Soviet codes and how they were broken, this is a rich and riveting history of the underbelly of the Cold War, and an essential and timely read for all who seek to understand the origins of the modern NSA. In paperback.

Pilgrimage: My Search for the Real Pope Francis by Mark K. Shriver. A down-to-earth and deeply intimate portrait of Pope Francis and his faith, based on interviews with the men and women who knew him simply as Jorge Mario Bergoglio. In paperback.

August 15, 2017:

The Store by James Patterson. Jacob and Megan Brandeis have gotten jobs with the mega-successful, ultra-secretive Store. Seems perfect. Seems safe. But their lives are about to become anything but perfect, anything but safe.
Especially since Jacob and Megan have a dark secret of their own. They're writing a book that will expose the Store--a forbidden book, a dangerous book.
And if the Store finds out, there's only one thing Jacob, Megan and their kids can do--run for their bloody lives. Which is probably impossible, because--
THE STORE IS ALWAYS WATCHING.

Home Fire: A Novel by Kamila Shamsie.
LONGLISTED FOR THE 2017 MAN BOOKER PRIZE
The suspenseful and heartbreaking story of an immigrant family driven to pit love against loyalty, with devastating consequences.

Things That Happened Before the Earthquake by Chiara Barzini. What’s better for a summer read than a fish out of water? This Italian writer's literary debut follows the travails of Eugenia, a privileged Roman teenager whose free-spirited parents move the family to L.A. right after the 1992 riots. They don’t much understand American culture, though, and naively plop Eugenia into a public high school rife with gangs. She’s a feisty, singular character: watch her navigate her new life, with the 1994 earthquake as catalyst.

How to Find Love in a Bookshop by Veronica Henry. The enchanting story of a bookshop, its grieving owner, a supportive literary community, and the extraordinary power of books to heal the heart.

The World Broke in Two: Virginia Woolf, T. S. Eliot, D. H. Lawrence, E. M. Forster and the Year That Changed Literature by Bill Goldstein. A revelatory narrative of the intersecting lives and works of the revered authors during 1922, the birth year of modernism.

Electric October: Seven World Series Games, Six Lives, Five Minutes of Fame That Lasted Forever by Kevin Cook. The story of six ordinary ballplayers whose paths crossed in the 1947 World Series--and the ways that epic October changed their lives.

Hello! My Name Is Tasty: Global Diner Favorites from Portland's Tasty Restaurants by John Gorham and Liz Crain. From the authors of the Toro Bravo cookbook, here are recipes from Portland’s favorites, Tasty n Sons and Tasty n Alder, the restaurants that reinvented the brunch scene (and then every eating hour after that) with supremely satisfying dishes.

BraveTart: Iconic American Desserts by Stella Parks and J. Kenji López-Alt. From an award-winning pastry chef and a James Beard Award nominated writer here are, foolproof recipes and a fresh take on the history of American desserts, from chocolate chip cookies to toaster pastries.

Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America by Ibram X. Kendi. Winner of the 2016 National Book Award for Nonfiction. Now in paperback.

The Last One: A Novel by Alexandra Oliva. Survival is the name of the game as the line blurs between reality TV and reality itself in this fast-paced novel of suspense. She wanted an adventure. She never imagined it would go this far. Staff recommended. In paperback.

Iggy Peck's Big Project Book for Amazing Architects by Andrea Beaty and David Roberts. Creativity meets curiosity and critical thinking in the new hands-on STEM project book from the bestselling team behind Iggy Peck, Architect; Rosie Revere, Engineer; and Ada Twist, Scientist. Paperback.

August 8, 2017:

Any Dream Will Do: A Novel by Debbie Macomber. A powerful standalone novel about a woman forced to start her life anew, embarking on the most courageous journey of all—to a place where she learns what love and trust really mean.

The Luster of Lost Things by Sophie Chen Keller. In this story for readers of The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time and A Man Called Ove, when all seems lost, he finds what matters most.
Walter Lavender Jr. is a master of finding. A wearer of high-tops. A maker of croissants. A son keeping vigil, twelve years counting.
Steeped in nostalgic wonder, this explores the depths of our capacity for kindness and our ability to heal. A lyrical meditation on why we become lost and how we are found, from the bright, broken heart of a boy who knows where to look for everyone but himself.

The Kelloggs: The Battling Brothers of Battle Creek by Howard Markel. The sweeping saga of two extraordinary men, whose lifelong competition and enmity toward one another changed America’s notion of health and wellness from the mid-nineteenth to the mid-twentieth centuries, and who helped change the course of American medicine, nutrition, wellness, and diet.

The Talented Ribkins by Ladee Hubbard. At seventy-two, Johnny Ribkins shouldn’t have such problems: He’s got one week to come up with the money he stole from his mobster boss or it’s curtains. 
What may or may not be useful to Johnny as he flees is that he comes from an African-American family that has been gifted with super powers that are a bit, well, odd.
A big-hearted debut novel about race, class, politics, and the unique gifts that, while they may cause some problems from time to time, bind a family together.

Bones: Brothers, Horses, Cartels, and the Borderland Dream by Joe Tone. The dramatic true story of two brothers living parallel lives on either side of the U.S.-Mexico border—and how their lives converged in a major criminal conspiracy.
Joe Tone’s riveting, exquisitely layered crime narrative, set against the high-stakes world of horse racing, is an intimate story about family, loyalty, and the tragic costs of a failed drug war. Compelling and complex, it sheds light on the perilous lives of American ranchers, the morally dubious machinery of drug and border enforcement, and the way greed and fear mingle with race, class, and violence along America’s vast Southwestern border. 

The Mystery Knight: A Graphic Novel by Ben Avery and George R. R. Martin. A full-color graphic novel edition of The Mystery Knight, one of the thrilling Dunk and Egg novellas from George R. R. Martin’s A Knight of the Seven Kingdoms and a prequel of sorts to A Game of Thrones.

Surfing with Sartre: An Aquatic Inquiry into a Life of Meaning by Aaron James. A book that—in the tradition of Shopclass as Soulcraft, Barbarian Days and Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance—uses the experience and the ethos of surfing to explore key concepts in philosophy. In developing his unique surfer-philosophical worldview, he draws from his own experience of surfing and from surf culture and lingo, and includes many relevant details from the lives of the philosophers,

At the Existentialist Café: Freedom, Being, and Apricot Cocktails with Jean-Paul Sartre, Simone de Beauvoir, Albert Camus, Martin Heidegger, Maurice Merleau-Ponty and Others by Sarah Bakewell. Named one of the Ten Best Books of 2016 by the New York Times, a spirited account of a major intellectual movement of the twentieth century and the revolutionary thinkers who came to shape it, by the best-selling author. In paperback.

A Life in Parts by Bryan Cranston. Cranston has much to say about creativity, devotion, and craft, as well as innate talent and its challenges and benefits and proper maintenance. “By turns gritty, funny, and sad” (Entertainment Weekly), ultimately this is a story about the joy, the necessity, and the transformative power of simple hard work. In paperback.

The Girl with the Lower Back Tattoo by Amy Schumer. The Emmy Award-winning comedian, actress, writer, and star of Inside Amy Schumer and the acclaimed film Trainwreck has taken the entertainment world by storm with her winning blend of smart, satirical humor. Now, Amy Schumer has written a refreshingly candid and uproariously funny collection of (extremely) personal and observational essays. In paperback.

How to Party With an Infant by Kaui Hart Hemmings. A hilarious and poignant novel from the author who has an uncanny ability to make disastrous romances and tragic circumstances not only relatable and funny, but unforgettable. In paperback.

August 1, 2017:

Mrs. Fletcher: A Novel by Tom Perrotta. From one of the most popular and bestselling authors of our time, a penetrating and hilarious new novel about sex, love, and identity on the frontlines of America’s culture wars. Eve Fletcher is trying to figure out what comes next. A forty-six-year-old divorcee whose beloved only child has just left for college... New [7/31/17] interview/review on npr. And new [8/3/17] review/interview in The Seattle Times here.

The Clockwork Dynasty: A Novel by Daniel H. Wilson. An ingenious new thriller that weaves a path through history, following a race of human-like machines that have been hiding among us for untold centuries, written by the bestselling author of Robopocalypse.

Pieces of Happiness by Anne Ostby. A novel of five lifelong friends who, in their sixties, decide to live together on a cocoa farm in Fiji, where they not only start a chocolate business but strengthen their friendships and rediscover themselves.

Crime Scene: A Novel by Jonathan Kellerman and Jesse Kellerman. A former star athlete turned deputy coroner is drawn into a brutal, complicated murder in this psychological thriller from a father-son writing team that delivers “brilliant, page-turning fiction” (Stephen King).

Conscience of a Conservative: A Rejection of Destructive Politics and a Return to Principle by Jeff Flake. In a bold act of conscience, Republican Senator Jeff Flake takes his party to task for embracing nationalism, populism, xenophobia, and the anomalous Trump presidency. The book is an urgent call for a return to bedrock conservative principle and a cry to once again put country before party. Flake wrote the book in secret because he didn't want his advisers to try to talk him out of it. New [7/31/17] interview/review on npr.

The Readymade Thief by Augustus Rose. Lee Cuddy is seventeen years old and on the run. Betrayed by her family after taking the fall for a friend, Lee finds refuge in a cooperative of runaways holed up in an abandoned building they call the Crystal Castle. But the façade of the Castle conceals a far more sinister agenda, one hatched by a society of fanatical men set on decoding a series of powerful secrets hidden in plain sight. And they believe Lee holds the key to it all. 
A novel of puzzles, conspiracies, secret societies, urban exploration, art history, and a singular, indomitable heroine, it heralds the arrival of a spellbinding and original new talent in fiction.

See What I Have Done by Sarah Schmidt. In this riveting debut novel, the author recasts one of the most fascinating murder cases of all time into an intimate story of a volatile household and a family devoid of love. New review in The Seattle Times.

The Dark Net by Benjamin Percy. Set in present-day Portland, this is a cracked-mirror horror version of the digital nightmare we already live in, a timely and wildly imaginative techno-thriller about the evil that lurks in real and virtual spaces, and the power of a united few to fight back. Staff recomended.

Faithful: A Novel by Alice Hoffman. A soul-searching story about a young woman struggling to redefine herself and the power of love, family, and fate. Staff recommended.  In paperback.

Leona: The Die Is Cast by Jenny Rogneby. This best-selling Scandinavian thriller follows its troubled heroine as she investigates a high-profile robbery for Stockholm's Violent Crimes Division.
This is a hard-boiled crime novel, filled with unexpected twists and turns, featuring an unusual heroine. This makes for gripping reading while challenging feminine norms and posing questions about what lies behind the choices we make. In paperback.

Crosstalk by Connie Willis. A genre-bending novel that pushes social media, smartphone technology, and twenty-four-hour availability to hilarious and chilling extremes as one young woman abruptly finds herself with way more connectivity than she ever desired. In paperback.

The Book That Matters Most: A Novel by Ann Hood. An enthralling novel about love, loss, secrets, friendship, and the healing power of literature. In paperback.

The River at Night: A Novel by Erica Ferencik.  A thriller set against the harsh beauty of the Maine wilderness,this novel charts the journey of four friends as they fight to survive the aftermath of a white water rafting accident. In paperback.

 



Upcoming Releases.

Glass Houses: A Chief Inspector Gamache Novel by Louise Penny. When a mysterious figure appears in Three Pines one cold November day, Armand Gamache and the rest of the villagers are at first curious. Then wary. Through rain and sleet, the figure stands unmoving, staring ahead.
In her latest utterly gripping book, the bestselling author shatters the conventions of the crime novel to explore what Gandhi called the court of conscience. A court that supersedes all others. August 29, 2017.

The Burning Girl by Claire Messud. In her first novel since The Woman Upstairs, Messud follows two childhood friends, Julia and Cassie, in their hometown of Royston, Mass. But after Cassie makes a life-threatening journey and damages their relationship, the two drift apart. A bracing, hypnotic coming-of-age story about the bond of best friends. Brilliantly mixing fable and coming-of-age tale, this gets to the heart of these matters in an absolutely irresistible way. August 29, 2017.

Dog Man: A Tale of Two Kitties by Dav Pilkey. In the third of this comic-style series for middle graders, the eponymous hero is half-dog, half-man. Plus he’s a cop, whose nemesis is a cat criminal named Petey. On a more existential level, Dog Man has to wrestle with his baser canine instincts (like the desire to tinkle on the carpet) as he battles crime. Internal 10-year-old of all kinds of adults may find Pilkey’s blend of complete absurdity, wordplay, and pee references hilarious! August 29, 2017.

Guinness World Records 2018: Meet our Real-Life Superheroes by Guinness World Records. With more than 3,000 new and updated records and 1,000 eye-popping photos, it has thousands of new stats and facts and dazzling new features.
From science to showbiz via stunts and sports, there are real-life heroes all around us in all shapes and sizes, achieving the extraordinary every day. August 29, 2017.

What Happened by Hillary Rodham Clinton.
For the first time, Hillary Rodham Clinton reveals what she was thinking and feeling during one of the most controversial and unpredictable presidential elections in history. Now free from the constraints of running, she takes us inside the intense personal experience of becoming the first woman nominated for president by a major party in an election marked by rage, sexism, exhilarating highs and infuriating lows, stranger-than-fiction twists, Russian interference, and an opponent who broke all the rules. This is her most personal memoir yet. Column about the upcoming book in The Seattle Times. September 12, 2017.

The Power by Naomi Alderman.
WINNER OF THE 2017 BAILEYS WOMEN'S PRIZE FOR FICTION
What would happen if women suddenly possessed a fierce new power?
This is speculative fiction at its most ambitious and provocative, at once taking us on a thrilling journey to an alternate reality, and exposing our own world in bold and surprising ways.
The world is a recognizable place: there's a rich Nigerian boy who lounges around the family pool; a foster kid whose religious parents hide their true nature; an ambitious American politician; a tough London girl from a tricky family. But then a vital new force takes root and flourishes, causing their lives to converge with devastating effect. Teenage girls now have immense physical power--they can cause agonizing pain and even death. And, with this small twist of nature, the world drastically resets. October 10, 2017.

The Book of Dust : Volume 1 by Philip Pullman. The much-anticipated new work from the author of The Golden Compass is coming at last! He returns to the parallel world of Lyra Belacqua and His Dark Materials for a thrilling and epic adventure in which daemons, alethiometers, and the Magisterium all play a part. October 19, 2017

In the Midst of Winter by Isabel Allende. A love story set in Brooklyn and South America about a human rights scholar and an immigrant from Guatemala. November 7, 2017.

Artemis: A Novel by Andy Weir. The bestselling author of The Martian returns with an irresistible new near-future thriller--a heist story set on the moon. November 14, 2017.

 



 

Reviews and Columns
Recent reviews of new and/or notable titles, books that have a specific interest to the northwest -- author and/or setting -- and one more place for us to share our latest favorites! Lots of links to articles about books.

 

 

August 10, 2017.  King Felix — and his masterful changeup — gets the royal treatment. In his new book, Off Speed, Terry McDermott explores pitching, Felix Hernandez’s 2012 perfect game and life — one pitch, and one inning (or chapter) at a time. An article and an exerpt in Pacific NW Magazine.

Off Speed: Baseball, Pitching, and the Art of Deception by Terry McDermott published May 16, 2017.

 


 

August 9, 2017. A big welcome to a brand new Independent Bookstore!! Brick & Mortar Books opened earlier this year in Redmond Town Center. The Lit Life column here.

 


 

 

August 7, 2017. Ted Chiang, Annie Proulx, Lindy West among Washington State Book Awards finalists. The Washington Center for the Book has announced the finalists for this year's Washington State Book Awards, which honors books published in 2016 by Washington authors. The article here.



 

July 27, 2017. Michael Connelly’s new book is his 30th, and it’s (mostly) Bosch-free.
In The Late Show, the best-selling crime-fiction author introduces a new character, LAPD Detective Renée Ballard, who works the night shift... Great new interview/review in The Seattle Times.



 

 

July 29, 2017. A Catalog of Birds soars from despair to hope, from pain to joy.
Laura Harrington’s new novel, set in 1970, initially seems like a coming-of-age story, but ultimately becomes so much more. The review in The Seattle Times.

 


 

July 27, 2017. Whodunit? 3 compelling new murder mysteries — all with something you didn’t see coming. Each of these three murder mysteries — two are debut novels — pulled critic Moira Macdonald into another world. The column here.

 


 

July 21, 2017. How Chris Colfer went from ‘Glee’ to author of books for middle-schoolers. Nicole Brodeur column here.

 

 


 

 

July 17, 2017. Edmonds resident wins book award.  Lisle A. Rose was awarded an honorable mention by the North American Society for Oceanic History in the 2016 Lyman Awards in U.S. Naval History for America's Sailors in the Great War: Seas, Skies, and Submarines, published November 29, 2016. View the article in the Edmonds Beacon here.
We have the book in stock, let us know if you would like us to hold a copy for you.

 


 

July 15, 2017. Crime-fiction roundup: 3 new books map searches for lost treasure.
It’s hardly a new plot device, but the search for treasure — be it surrealist sculptures, Egyptian antiquities or Ernest Hemingway’s fishing gear — is gripping in these three books. The column here.

 


 

 

July 13, 2017. Author David Grann talks about the genesis of his true-crime story Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI. The article here. The book was published April 18, 2017.

 

 


 

 

July 10, 2017. Well Read TV. You Don't Have to Say You Love Me: A Memoir by Sherman Alexie. The episode here, and there is a bonus web extra moment with Mr. Alexie. Worth it.

 



cover image: Images of the West

June 15, 2017. Images of the West, a lovely coffee table book by local author and gallery owner, Randall J. Hodges.
We are thrilled to be one of the very few places to carry Mr. Hodges' beautiful new book.

Randall J Hodges Fine Art Photography Gallery is located at 317 Main Street, Edmonds.

Visit his web site here.

And there is a fantastic article/interview in the Edmonds Beacon that tells all: how he started taking photos; how he ended up in Edmonds; the tripod rule... here.

 

 


 

 

May 31, 2017. Found: A Life in Mountain Rescue, published in paperback, May 1, 2017. Local author/climber Bree Loewen writes about a life in mountain rescue. Loewen, who lives in Carnation, writes a page-turner of a memoir about her volunteer work with Seattle Mountain Rescue. The review here.

 

 




Movies, TV, Plays
We can't figure out if Hollywood is just completely out of new ideas, or if they finally figured out what all of us already know -- you will never run out of great books! Here are just some of the latest titles to make it to the stage or screen, current and upcoming...

 

 


Current...

Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood. Coming as a Hulu original series. Adapted from the classic novel this is the story of life in the dystopia of Gilead, a totalitarian society in what was formerly the United States. Facing environmental disasters and a plunging birthrate, Gilead is ruled by a twisted fundamentalism in its militarized ‘return to traditional values'. As one of the few remaining fertile women, Offred (Elisabeth Moss) is a Handmaid in the Commander’s household, one of the caste of women forced into sexual servitude as a last desperate attempt to repopulate the world. Also starring Alexis Bledel [Gilmore Girls] and Samira Wiley [Orange is the New Black]. The 10-episode first season premiered on April 26, 2017.

New [4/26/17] review here. "... a terrifying story of a future that looks like the past. The Hulu series, based on the 1985 Margaret Atwood novel, is a cautionary tale, a story of resistance and a work of impeccable world-building. It is unflinching, vital and scary as hell."

The Dark Tower by Stephen King. This adaptation has been in development limbo forever. Combining sci-fi, western, and horror elements, the film is about Roland Deschain (Idris Elba) traversing an Old West-style world in search of the Man in Black (Matthew McConaughey), as well as the Dark Tower, which might save the world. Nikolaj Arcel is directing and King, Ron Howard, and Brian Grazer are producing. A TV series is expected to follow in 2018, showing Sony's commitment to the project. Official movie trailer here Scheduled release date: August 4, 2017.

The Glass Castle by Jeannette Walls. A young girl comes of age in a dysfunctional family of nonconformist nomads with a mother who's an eccentric artist and an alcoholic father who would stir the children's imagination with hope as a distraction to their poverty. Based on the 2005 memoir. Walls herself (the adult version is played by Brie Larson, the 10-year-old version by Ella Anderson), her artist mother (Naomi Watts), alcoholic father (Woody Harrelson), and Walls's three siblings. Scheduled release date: August 11, 2017.

Future release dates ...

It by Stephen King. In the small town of Derry, Maine, seven children come face-to-face with life problems, bullies and a monster that takes the shape of a clown called Pennywise. This time around Bill Skarsgård is playing Pennywise. The first trailer has been released. Scheduled for release September 8, 2017.

The Snowman by Jo Nesbo. Detective Harry Hole, the hard-boiled detective created by the Norwegian crime novelist, investigates the disappearance of a woman whose pink scarf is found wrapped around an ominous-looking snowman. Starring Michael Fassbender, Val Kilmer, Chloë Sevigny, J.K. Simmons. Scheduled for release October 13, 2017.

Murder on the Orient Express by Agatha Christie. The classic mystery tells the tale of a murder on a train under investigation by detective Hercule Poirot. This new adaptation will star Johnny Depp, Michelle Pfeiffer, Star Wars: The Force Awaken breakout actress Daisy Ridley, Hamilton star Leslie Odom Jr. and Penelope Cruz as Ohlsson. Scheduled for release November 22, 2017.

Alias Grace by Margaret Atwood. A novel based on the true story of Grace Marks, a housemaid and immigrant from Ireland who was imprisoned in 1843, perhaps wrongly, for the murder of her employer Thomas Kinnear. Grace claims to have no memory of the murder yet the facts are irrefutable. A decade after, Dr. Simon Jordan tries to help Grace recall her past.
Margaret Atwood will be stepping back in time and in front of the cameras for the TV adaptation of her novel in a cameo as "the disapproving woman." [which she gleefully tweeted to all of her followers!]
Special 6-episode mini-series co-production [CBS/Netflix] coming in 2017.

On Chesil Beach by Ian McEwan. The author adapted his delicate novella, about a young couple on their wedding night in 1962, for the screen; Saorise Ronan, who starred in the excellent movie version of Atonement, plays the new bride. No date set, but this sounds like the sort of movie that gets held for end-of-year release. TBA 2017.

Annihilation by Jeff VanderMeer. This sci-fi film, based on  2014 novel (the first of his Southern Reach trilogy), is about an expedition to find a missing man in an environmental disaster zone (the less you know, the better). The cast includes Natalie Portman, Jennifer Jason Leigh, Gina Rodriguez, Tessa Thompson, Oscar Isaac, and David Gyasi. Alex Garland (Ex Machina) is directing. TBA 2017.

It's What I Do: A Photographer's Life of Love and War by Lynsey Addario. [published February 5, 2015] A Pacific Northwest bestseller spring of 2015. A memoir by the award-winning international photojournalist. Director: Steven Spielberg. Starring: Jennifer Lawrence. TBA 2017.

Looking for Alaska by John Green. Green's first young adult novel. TBA 2017.

Brain on Fire: My Month of Madness by Susannah Cahalan. A 2012 bestselling autobiography by the New York Post writer. It details her struggle with a rare autoimmune disease and her recovery. TBA 2017.

The November Criminals by Sam Munson. The author's first novel for young adults is a thoughtful coming-of-age story and an engaging teenage noir. TBA 2017.

Fifty Shades Freed by E. L. James. The final book in the Fifty Shades saga, Christian and Ana navigate their most dangerous, treacherous relationship yet: marriage.
Who's starring: Jamie Dornan and Dakota Johnson fill the shoes of Christian and Ana again, while newcomers like Arielle Kebbel will join the franchise. Scheduled release date February 9, 2018.

Ready Player One by Ernest Cline. When the creator of a popular video game system dies, a virtual contest is created to compete for his billions. A contest users are willing to kill to win. Director: Steven Spielberg. Writer: Ernest Cline (screenplay). Scheduled release date March 30, 2018.

Where'd You Go, Bernadette by Maria Semple. After her anxiety-ridden mother disappears, 15-year-old Bee does everything she can to track her down, discovering her troubled past in the process.
Director: Richard Linklater; Stars: Cate Blanchett, Kristen Wiig, Billy Crudup. TBA.

The Good Lord Bird by James McBride. Liev Schreiber and Jaden Smith will star. Smith will play a young slave who hooks up with radical abolitionist John Brown (Schreiber) in 1856 Kansas. The Good Lord Bird won the 2013 National Book Award. Listed as "in development" so, possibly a movie in theaters sometime in 2017, or...

The Passage by Justin Cronin. No date announced yet. Book #2 in the series, The Twelve, was finally published October 16, 2012. And is now available in paperback [7/30/13]. Book three: The City of Mirrors: A Novel was finally published May 24, 2016! The first movie is still listed as "in development..."

Moviemaker Todd Field has arranged to produce, co-write and direct Beautiful Ruins, the newest [2012] Jess Walter novel. Field previously directed Little Children, based on the Tom Perrotta novel. More info as it becomes available...

 



Book Awards
There are an amazing number of awards given to books and authors throughout the year. We will attempt to keep you updated on the big ones, and on the ones we particularly agree with.

 

August 7, 2017. The Washington State Book Awards: Ted Chiang, Annie Proulx, Lindy West among Washington State Book Awards finalists. The Washington Center for the Book has announced the finalists for this year's Washington State Book Awards, which honors books published in 2016 by Washington authors. The article here.

A partial list here:

Fiction
The Solace of Monsters by Laurie Blauner, of Seattle
Stories of Your Life and Others by Ted Chiang
Barkskins by Annie Proulx, of Carnation
Lovecraft Country by Matt Ruff, of Seattle
Daredevils by Shawn Vestal, of Spokane


History/General Nonfiction
The Immortal Irishman by Timothy Egan, of Seattle
Eruption: The Untold Story of Mount St. Helens by Steve Olson, of Seattle
While the City Slept: A Love Lost to Violence and a Young Man’s Descent into Madness by Eli Sanders, of Seattle
Turning Homeward: Restoring Hope and Nature in the Urban Wild by Adrienne Ross Scanlan, of Seattle
Seawomen of Iceland: Survival on the Edge by Margaret Willson, of Seattle

 

 


 

 

July 26, 2017. The Man Booker Prize 2017 Longlist announced.

  • 4 3 2 1 by Paul Auster (US)

  • Days Without End by Sebastian Barry (Ireland)

  • History of Wolves by Emily Fridlund (US)

  • Exit West by Mohsin Hamid (Pakistan-UK)

  • Solar Bones by Mike McCormack (Ireland)

  • Reservoir 13 by Jon McGregor (UK)

  • Elmet by Fiona Mozley (UK)

  • The Ministry Of Utmost Happiness by Arundhati Roy (India)

  • Lincoln in the Bardo by George Saunders (US)

  • Home Fire by Kamila Shamsie (UK-Pakistan)

  • Autumn by Ali Smith (UK)

  • Swing Time by Zadie Smith (UK)

  • The Underground Railroad by Colson Whitehead (US)

The short list will be announced September 13, 2017. Visit the ManBooker website for all kinds of information.

 


 

June 15, 2017. Author Naomi Alderman wins the 2017 Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction for The Power.

What would happen if women suddenly possessed a fierce new power?
The world is a recognizable place: there's a rich Nigerian boy who lounges around the family pool; a foster kid whose religious parents hide their true nature; an ambitious American politician; a tough London girl from a tricky family. But then a vital new force takes root and flourishes, causing their lives to converge with devastating effect. Teenage girls now have immense physical power--they can cause agonizing pain and even death. And, with this small twist of nature, the world drastically resets.

From award-winning author Naomi Alderman, this is speculative fiction at its most ambitious and provocative, at once taking us on a thrilling journey to an alternate reality, and exposing our own world in bold and surprising ways.

 To be published in the United States October 10, 2017.

Tessa Ross, 2017 Chair of Judges, said: “The judges and I were thrilled to make this decision. We debated this wonderful shortlist for many hours but kept returning to Naomi Alderman’s brilliantly imagined dystopia – her big ideas and her fantastic imagination.”

The other short-listed finalists were:

  • Stay With Me by Ayọ̀bámi Adébáyọ̀̀
  • The Dark Circle by Linda Grant
  • The Sport of Kings by C.E. Morgan
  • First Love by Gwendoline Riley
  • Do Not Say We Have Nothing by Madeleine Thien

The Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction is the UK’s most prestigious annual book award for fiction written by a woman.

See all kinds of information about the prize, and winners, current and former, here.

 


 

April 27, 2017. Mystery Writers of America is proud to announce the winners of the
2017 Edgar Allan Poe Awards
, honoring the best in mystery fiction, non-fiction and television published or produced in 2016.
A few highlights:

  • Best Novel: Before the Fall by Noah Hawley. [also staff recommended]
  • Best First Novel by an American Author: Under the Harrow by Flynn Berry.
  • Best Paperback Original: Rain Dogs by Adrian McKinty.
  • Best Fact Crime:  The Wicked Boy: The Mystery of a Victorian Child Murderer by Kate Summerscale
  • Best Critical/Biography: Shirley Jackson: A Rather Haunted Life by Ruth Franklin

For the complete list of the winners and all of the nominees visit The Edgars web site.

 


 

April 10, 2017. 2017 Pulitzer winners have been announced!

Fiction: The Underground Railroad, by Colson Whitehead.

Fiction finalists:

  • Imagine Me Gone by Adam Haslett.

  • The Sport of Kings by C. E. Morgan

History:  Blood in the Water: The Attica Prison Uprising of 1971 and Its Legacy, by Heather Ann Thompson.

Biography or Autobiography: The Return: Fathers, Sons and the Land in Between, by Hisham Matar.

Biography finalists:

  • In the Darkroom, by Susan Faludi
  • When Breath Becomes Air, by the late Paul Kalanithi

General Nonfiction: Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City, by Matthew Desmond.

The complete list of winners and finalists in all categories are available at the official Pulitzer web site.

 

 

 


 

March 27, 2017. PEN America is thrilled to announce the winners for its 2017 PEN America Literary Awards. 

  • PEN/John Kenneth Galbraith Award for Nonfiction: To an author of a distinguished book of general nonfiction published in 2015 or 2016 possessing notable literary merit and critical perspective and illuminating important contemporary issues:
    Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City by Matthew Desmond.
  • PEN/E.O. Wilson Literary Science Writing Award: For a book of literary nonfiction on the subject of the physical or biological sciences published in 2016:
    Patient H.M.: A Story of Memory, Madness, and Family Secrets by Luke Dittrich.
  • PEN Open Book Award: For an exceptional book-length work of literature by an author of color published in 2016:
    What Is Not Yours Is Not Yours by Helen Oyeyemi.

For all of the information visit the PEN web site.

 

 


 

March 16, 2017. Recipients of the National Book Critic Circle Awards for publishing year 2016:

  • Poetry. Ishion Hutchinson. House of Lords and Commons.
  • Criticism. Carol Anderson. White Rage: The Unspoken Truth of Our Racial Divide
  • Autobiography. Hope Jahren. Lab Girl.
  • Biography. Ruth Franklin. Shirley Jackson: A Rather Haunted Life
  • Nonfiction. Matthew Desmond. Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City
  • Fiction. Louise Erdrich. LaRose.
  • The winner of the 2016 John Leonard Prize which honors an author's first book in any genre:
    Yaa Gyasi for Homegoing.
  • The Ivan Sandrof Lifetime Achievement Award: Margaret Atwood.

More information and all of the details available at the web site: bookcritics.org

 


 

January 23, 2017. American Library Association announces 2017 youth media award winners:

  • John Newbery Medal for most outstanding contribution to children's literature: The Girl Who Drank the Moon, written by Kelly Barnhill. The story is pure magic, distinguished by careful development of a complex plot and indelible evocation of unique characters. Love, heartbreak, hope, sorrow, and wonder all shine in exquisite, lyrical prose.
  • Randolph Caldecott Medal for the most distinguished American picture book for children: Radiant Child: The Story of Young Artist Jean-Michel Basquiat by Javaka Steptoe. Steptoe, an author and artist who has illustrated a dozen books, is the son of illustrator John Steptoe. Radiant Child also earned the Coretta Scott King (Illustrator) Book Award.
    Like Jean-Michel Basquiat’s work, Steptoe’s illustrations radiate energy and immediacy. A patch-worked canvas of scavenged wood, painted and collaged with photos, and images of human anatomy, evokes the improvisatory nature of Basquiat’s art. “Radiant Child” resonates with emotion that connects Steptoe with Basquiat and Basquiat with young readers.
  • Printz and YALSA awards for excellence in literature and nonfiction for young adults, respectively: March: Book Three, created by Rep. John Lewis (D-Ga.), Andrew Aydin and Nate Powell, took home both the Printz and the YALSA, as well as the Robert F. Sibert award for most distinguished informational book for children. Lewis and co-writer Aydin were also awarded the Coretta Scott King (Author) Book Award, recognizing an African American author of outstanding books for children and young adults.

For more information about the winners, the 2017 Honor Books, and all of the awards the ALA bestowed this year: ala.org web site

 






2017 PNBA book awards


 

January 10, 2017.  2017 Pacific Northwest Book Awards announced:

  • Thunder Boy Jr. by Sherman Alexie. Alexie's first book for children is a picture book to cherish, starring a strong-willed little boy who just wants to make his mark on the world with a name all his own.
  • Bitch Planet Book One: Extraordinary Machine by Kelly Sue DeConnick. A smart, profane, and thoroughly terrifying examination of widespread intersectional oppression that feels all too familiar. Pick up this book and join the ranks of the Non-Compliant.
  • To The Bright Edge Of The World by Eowyn Ivey. Returning to the same lush Alaskan landscape as The Snow Child, Ivey's second novel is as stunning and enchanting as her first. An absorbing and beautiful epistolary novel of adventure, danger and discovery and a love story fraught with an equal fear of the unknown.
  • On Trails: An Exploration by Robert Moor. In this excellent debut, Moor guides the reader with evolution, anthropology, adventure and reflection through the literal and metaphorical trails that lead our lives.
  • Barkskins by Annie Proulx. A sweeping saga spanning more than 700 pages and nearly 300 years, Proulx's magnum opus follows two families for generations as they attempt to tame their world and conquer the physical and metaphorical forests that surround them. A lush and ambitious piece of literature that may be her best work yet.
  • Marrow Island by Alexis M. Smith. Marrow Island was once another jewel of the beautiful San Juans but has become the jagged memory of disaster—one that took the life of Lucie’s father. Addressing environmental issues, cult behavior, family loss and broken friendships, Marrow Island is an original and riveting read.
  • Shrill: Notes from a Loud Woman by Lindy West. This brilliant book will make your sides hurt with laughter while inspiring empathy to the difficulties of living as a large, feminist woman in today's world. West uses humor as a gateway to grab the attention of those who may not normally want to read a "feminist book." A conversation starting read.

 

 


 

 

November 16, 2016. The National Book Award winners have been announced.

  • Fiction: Colson Whitehead, The Underground Railroad
  • Nonfiction: Ibram X. Kendi, Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America
  • Poetry: Daniel Borzutzky, The Performance of Becoming Human
  • Young People's Literature: John Lewis, Andrew Aydin & Nate Powell (Artist), March: Book Three

For all of the long lists and the finalists visit the National Book Foundation web site.

Great article in The Seattle Times.

 

 


 

October 13, 2016. The Nobel Prize in Literature for 2016. Something is happening: Bob Dylan wins the Nobel in literature. The singer-songwriter was recognized for "having created new poetic expressions within the great American song tradition." Article in The Seattle Times.

And for all kinds of "interesting" reactions, [pro and con!] just Google it... fascinating!

 

 

 



 



Other Book-Related News
There is always something going on in the Seattle book world! Author appearances in and around the Northwest, interesting book-related news, anything that doesn't fit in the above categories we'll mention here.

 

Seattle Arts & Lectures 2017-18 season announced:

The Literary Arts Series presents original talks by six outstanding authors whose works range from multi-award-winning novels and short stories to social commentaries and biographies. 

  • Wednesday, October 18, 2017. Ron Chernow.  A new biography of Ulysses S. Grant.
  • Tuesday, November 28, 2017. Isabel Allende. With her new novel In the Midst of Winter.
  • Wednesday, January 17, 2018. Jesmyn Ward.
  • Thursday, February 15, 2018. Colson Whitehead.
  • Friday, March 30, 2018. Laura Lippman and David Simon.
  • Monday, May 7, 2018. Viet Thanh Nguyen.

2017 - 2018 Season Schedules announced for all of the series: The Poetry Series; Women you Need to Know; Sherman Alexie Loves; Latest Works and Literary Delights.

For the complete schedules, more information about all of the series, and to buy tickets, visit the Seattle Arts & Lecture web site.

 

 


Town Hall is Seattle’s community cultural center, offering a broad program of music, humanities, civic discourse, and world culture events.

Visit the web site for scheduled events.

 


 

The Seattle Public Library always has lots of visiting authors and book-related events.

  • August 17, 2017. Thursday at 7pm. Tom Perrotta discusses Mrs. Fletcher at the Central Library.
    From one of the most popular and bestselling authors of our time, a penetrating and hilarious new novel about sex, love, and identity on the frontlines of America’s culture wars.
  • October 14, 2017. Saturday at 7 pm. 2017 Washington State Book Awards.
    At the Central Library. Celebrate the literature and incredible authors of Washington at this year's Washington State Book Awards! Free and open to the public.

Visit the Seattle Public Library web site for the details, and the complete schedule of events.

 


 

Seattle Children's Theatre has great family-friendly fare on offer! And quite often there is a book involved.

The 2017 - 2018 season has been announced:

  • September 28–November 26, 2017 Go, Dog. Go!
    The madcap party never stops with these zany canines. High-spirited singing, zooming cars, construction zone chaos, and up-all-night antics will have the whole family in stitches.
  • November 9–December 31, 2017 Mr. Popper's Penguins
    Mr. and Mrs. Popper are an ordinary couple in an ordinary English town…until some extraordinary Antarctic penguins come to stay!
  • January 18–March 4, 2018 The Little Prince
    In the middle of the Sahara Desert, a stranded aviator meets the Little Prince, a young boy from a small, faraway asteroid, and a dreamlike journey unfolds across a universe.

Visit the web site for the details and the complete schedule!

 


 

Book-It Repertory Theater.

Visit the Book-It web site for the complete schedule and more details.

Announcing the 2017-2018 Mainstage Season:

  • September 13–October 15, 2017. I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, by Maya Angelou.

  • February 7–April 2, 2018. The Maltese Falcon, by Dashiell Hammett.
    A theatrical culinary collaboration with Café Nordo in Pioneer Square.

  • April 19–May 6, 2018. The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, by Junot Díaz.




The 5th Avenue Theatre 2016-17 season schedule has been announced. As usual, it includes a couple of performances based on books!

  • April 6 - 29, 2018. Kiss Me, Kate. Celebrating its 70th Anniversary! Kiss Me, Kate is the multi-Tony Award®-winning Cole Porter masterpiece that set the standard for great musicals and then broke the mold. A play-within-a-play inspired by William Shakespeare’s The Taming of the Shrew,

  • June 1 – 24, 2018. The Hunchback of Notre Dame. Based on the novel by Victor Hugo.
    A glorious retelling of Victor Hugo’s epic masterpiece, this powerful tale of love, faith and prejudice will leave you utterly spellbound. Its lush, beautiful score is unlike anything in musical theater today, featuring songs from the Disney animated feature and new music from legendary composers Alan Menken and Stephen Schwartz. Immerse yourself in the power and glory of rapturous music; melt with the passion of a magnificent story.

Visit the web site for the entire season schedule and all of the other details. 5thAvenue.org



The Village Theatre. Locations in Everett and Issaquah.

For all kinds of information visit the web site: VillageTheatre.org


 

 
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